Big boys and their quantum toys

  1. Computers need to get better. Several companies have announced quantum models with 100+ qubits. Algorithms that use so many qubits cannot realistically be simulated on classical computers, thus starting to open a chasm between what can be done with quantum and what can be done with classical. Of course, qubit count is not the only measure of a computer’s power (coherence and connectivity are a few other measures) but these hardware developments are promising.
  2. More people. It is hard to hire quantum-literate scientists and engineers to develop and implement quantum algorithms. While universities and corporate training programs are doing their best to increase the supply, the demand for the quantum workforce is large. One problem is that writing quantum software is quite difficult today, often requiring PhD-level understanding of quantum information science, in addition to an understanding of the business problem that needs to be solved.
  3. Better development platforms. 100- or 1000-qubit computers simply cannot be programmed using the same methods that were used for 5- or 10-qubit machines. One can no longer expect to successfully work at the gate-level or use rigid pre-built code blocks. A new way to specify algorithmic behavior and convert that spec into a working circuit is required. Classiq is addressing this problem, hoping also to help solve the “more people” problem by making quantum programming more accessible to a wider audience.

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Yuval Boger

Yuval Boger

Yuval Boger — The Qubit Guy — talks about business and technical subjects related to quantum computing and quantum technology.